Goppion’s installations specifically designed for the Nationalmuseum of Stockholm: a journey through light and colour

Goppion’s installations specifically designed for the Nationalmuseum of Stockholm: a journey through light and colour

Stockholm’s Nationalmuseum reopened to the public in autumn 2018 completely renovated and with ampler spaces for exhibition and services. The collections comprise of painting, sculpture, drawings and prints from 1500-1900 and applied arts, design and portraits from early Middle Ages up until present day. 

The five-year renovation project has created an open museum accessible to visitors, where the artworks can be experienced both on a large and small scale, preserving the integrity of the architectural heritage. The new climate control system means that the museum’s collections can be presented in an integrated manner, overcoming the boundaries between the artistic disciplines. Thus, paintings and other works more sensitive to environmental factors, such as drawings and graphics, can be presented together with applied art and design. This allows for the display of a larger number of works and improves the visitor’s experience by entwining numerous stories.

The outfitting of the Museum was entrusted entirely to Goppion, whose staff worked side by side with the museum team, with the architects and with the light designers to develop a family of integrated exhibition elements including display cases, bases, platforms and walls. One hundred new display cases of different types (freestanding, wall, window case) and of a great variety of shapes, sizes and functions, house the extremely heterogeneous works of the most important and varied art collection in Sweden (over 700,000 pieces). The collection includes 17th and 18th century paintings and crafts, 18th century French art and 17th century Dutch art, as well as the largest Scandinavian porcelain collection.

The display cases are characterized by a simple linear design, with interiors echoing the shades of the plaster in the different rooms, inspired by the same colours that adorned the interiors of the 19thcentury building.